Word of the Day – Drop

Just Missed It

Photo by Kristýna Landová

Drop (noun)

  1. A drop is anytime the disc unintentionally lands on the ground. That definition seems obvious but the drop has a deeper importance. Freestyle Frisbee is all about mastery of the flying disc. Players try to push themselves and the disc to the limits of what is physically possible, always looking for a new trick. There is a certain high that comes from seemingly defying gravity and doing the impossible through one’s own will. A drop is a cruel reminder that the control we all seek might just be an illusion.

Example: That drop was caused by a sudden gust of gravity.

Episode 32: FPAW 2017 Interviews With The Winners

Hear directly from the 2017 FPA World Champions. When you’re done listening, watch the videos here. In order of appearance:

FPAW 2017 CoOp Winners on the PodiumCo-op
Christian Lamred
Florian Hess
Alex Leist

 

FPAW 2017 Woman's Pairs Winners on the PodiumWomens Pairs
Bianca Strunz
Lisa Hunrichs

 

FPAW 2017 Mixed Pairs Winners on the PodiumMixed
James Wiseman
Lori Daniels

 

FPAW 2017 Open Pairs Winners on the PodiumOpen Pairs
James Wiseman
Ryan Young

Poll: Which of Your Throws Has The Most Clockwise Spin?

Bennie ThrowsA while back, I asked the question, which of your throws has the most spin? The answers were pretty much what I expected, a good cross section of throws with backhand being the leader. Now I want to dive a little deeper. This will be a two part poll with this one focussed on clock and next weeks focused on counter. Since roughly 90% of human beings are right handed I’m guessing that the results will be quite different between the two spins. My hope is the results can help new players decide which throws to focus on when they are learning. This weeks poll:

 

Which of your throws has the most clockwise spin?

Which of your throws has the most clockwise spin

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If you answered other, please let me know what I missed in the comments. 

Ryan Young Teaches How To Cuff to Flatten the Disc During a Brush Run

Ryan Young demonstrates how to cuff the disc to flatten it while on a brushing run. Often times, especially when in high speed wind, the disc will become too steep during a brushing run. This can cause the pace of the run to suddenly change, which creates break in the flow of the jam. It also can cause a loss of control as you run into or past the disc. In more severe wind, the disc can blow behind you and roll away. By using the skill Ryan is demonstrating you can maintain control and even avoid any break in the flow of the jam.

OK, so let’s break it down. There are three steps; brush to add spin, cuff to flatten, and brush to continue the run.

Let’s say you’re on a run and the disc becomes to steep. On challenge may be that it is spinning quite slowly. Of course, cuffs use a lot of spin. So, Ryan suggests first doing a quick brush to add spin. This is step one. I often do this before a cuff as well and not just for this circumstance. With practice, the brush-to-cuff becomes a single move instead of two. The key to success here is to change the height of the disc as little as possible. Think “stun it”.

Now it’s time to cuff it flat. With clock spin, touch it lightly at 3 o’clock with the back of your hand. With counter, touch it at 9 o’clock. If your hand is wet, all the better…the wetness reduces friction. However, this is not required. As you touch, slowly lift and left the disc glide. As you lift your hand the disc will flatten out. Ryan suggests slowly moving your hand towards 6 o’clock. Just remember, soft touch and let the disc glide.

Once the disc is at the desired angle, it’s time to brush it again and continue the run. Exactly which brush you use will depend the situation after the cuff. But, as Ryan suggests, this brush must happen quickly. The key here is to use this brush to maintain/regain control. It’s not about adding spin or perfect placement. Just get it back into the air where you can deal with it. And, be ready to brush with either hand, especially in a strong wind, because the disc could now be quite high in the air. Or, in lower wind it might be falling really fast so even a kick brush or kick tip may be in order. Ryan suggests trying to connect the cuff to the next brush. This is a great suggestion as the cuff-to-brush will eventually become a single move. My latest adaptation is to let the cuff turn into a guide so I can, with a single contact, flatten the disc and then push it forward gently to give myself enough time for next trick…no third brush required. 

This brush–cuff-brush skill, though not sexy, will greatly enhance your ability to maintain control over disc that’s become too steep and is starting to get away. We’d love to hear your strategies for maintaining disc control. Let us know in the comments.

Episode 31: Joey Hudoklin – “The Oracle”

Joey HudoklinHear how Hall of Famer, Joey Hudoklin, discovered Freestyle. As a kid growing up in Greenwich Village, he mostly concentrated on mainstream sports like baseball & basketball. Then one summer day in 1975, he ventured to Washington Square with some friends and a frisbee appeared. Seeing the overhand wrist flip caught his eye and got him hooked. Later trips to the Bandshell in Central Park allowed him to witness the inception of some of the moves we have all come to use and love. Find out who truly inspired Joey in the beginning. Also hear Joey’s thoughts on playing in high people-traffic areas. Jake shares his thoughts as well, which are a little different. 

Poll: How Many Flying Discs Do You Own?

Small Part of My Disc Collection

A wise person once told me, “what you emphasize in your life will grow.” When I look at the boxes and shelves full of flying discs in my house, I certainly believe this statement to be true. I have discs from events, from being an FPA member, playing stock, a collection of antiques, experimental discs, and more. It’s clear that flying discs are a major focus for me. So now I’m turning to you:

How Many Flying Discs Do You Own?

How Many Flying Discs Do You Own?

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Thanks, Lusti, for the poll idea. If anyone else has poll ideas, leave them in the comments below or send me a message on Facebook.

Episode 30: Mehrdad Hosseinian Learns the Chicken Wing in 2 Minutes Flat

Mehrdad shares how he first discovered Frisbee in 2001. He was attracted to the disc for several years before discovering Freestyle, but those years had a big influence on his current game. As a spectator in 2005 at the German Championships, he felt somewhat intimidated, but decided to compete in 2006. It was his first trip to the USA however, for the 2013 FPA World Championships in Santa Cruz, that turned a corner for him. Not only did he see some of the Freestyle legends in person and get some memorable advice, but it was afterwards that Paul Kenny asked him to play pairs at the 2015 Worlds, in Karlsruhe, Germany, which, by the way, they won. He credits Paul and his first experience at building a routine  as having a big impact on his confidence and dedication. Find out how Mehrdad learned to throw the Chicken Wing, or learn it from his teacher here. Also, Mehrdad shares some of his underlying wisdom about listening & learning from others. Randy recalls meeting Mehrdad and Harold for the first time in Berlin and speaking the international language of the mob-op jam. Do you speak that language?

Poll: How Do You Warm Up For a Jam?

Charles JammingJamming can be quite a workout for the body. It involves running, jumping, bending, changing directions, and extending to the max as players try to push the envelope of their games. So it makes sense for players to engage in some sort of warmup activity before going full speed into the jam. I have observed that people seem to have a different take on exactly how to warm up. So this poll asks:

How Do You Warm Up For a Jam? Select All That Apply.

How Do You Warm Up For a Jam? Select all That Apply.

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In the comments, add some details on how you like to warm up.

Lori Daniels Demonstrates the Chicken Wing Throw

The chicken wing throw is similar to a back hand throw. However, instead of throwing across your body and using the pull back to generate spin, this throw curls the arm under the armpit and uses an unwinding motion to generate the spin. Many players, especially women believe this to be the throw that generates the most spin. In this video, Lori Daniels demonstrates how to execute this throw.

Grip the tightly. Then bend at the wrist, the elbow, and the shoulder. Tuck the disc under your armpit. Now step back on the opposite leg and twist your back for a little more windup. Then, unwind like a spring, releasing the disc at the end. The motion will seem to pull or rip the disc out of your hand.

When I first started learning this throw, I found the disc would release from my hand much earlier than I thought. It took many practice throws by myself to gain the ability to predict where it would go. However, I’ve always felt I could generate alot of spin. Now, this is one of my favorite long distance, left handed throws (I’m a righty). Tell use what you think of the chicken wing in the comments below. Can you generate a ton of spin with it?