The Crank Part 1 – With the Spin

In this video, I describe the 4 basic, with the spin cranks. The crank is a nail delay move in which arm that is controlling the disc rotates either; up, around, and back under the arm pit or under the arm pit, back, around and down…its makes more sense if you watch it. The with the spin crank on the rim is a really good move to learn as a beginner. It will allow you to do many tricks and help you gain control over the nose of the disc.

Watch the video or read my written article about the cranks for more details.

Matt Demonstrates Learning the Center Nail Delay

The center nail delay is the basis for much of Freestyle Frisbee. It is the act of spinning the frisbee on your finger nail. Matt explains how to practice so you can master this skill.

First, give yourself a two handed throw. Be sure you choose the spin, clock or counter, that you want to practice. This throw is good because the disc comes to you perfectly flat. Now, let the disc land softly on your finger nail. Most people use the index finger, but any finger nail works. In fact sometimes I use two, or all five (the claw). Keep the disc above your head so you can see the center. As the disc slides on your fingernail, move your finger so it stays in the center. This may mean moving your feet to pursue the disc. Stay loose and chase it around. If it falls all the way to the rim, no problem. That’s called a rim delay. Just let it spin there, trying to keep only your fingernail contacting the disc. The rim delay is also a useful skill. As you get better at both the center delay and the rim delay, bring your arm down until you have control while looking at the top of the disc.

Have advice for someone trying to learn this skill? Let us know in the comments.

Rim Delay to Center Delay

Lori Daniels demonstrates going from a rim delay to a center delay. This is a critical skill that marks a new level of nail delay control in one’s game. It is used all the time since the disc may come in at and any angle. It is also used if center control is lost. As this skill improves so will center control and eventually you’ll be able to set and angle you want.

Here Lori uses a technique swooping down and then lifting upwards. As the disc travels up push across at a right angle to the center. This will cause the disc to tilt and flatten outs. As it flattens spiral your nail in towards the center and gain center delay control. For an in-depth written description of this skill, check out this article I wrote back in the 90s.

The Outer Rim Delay

Paul Kenny explains the Outer Rim Delay.

In this trick, you nail delay the disc on the outside of the rim. The only more difficult nail move I can imagine is a rim delay on the top lip of the disc. Anyhow, the wind can be a key factor so be sure to face the wind before you start. Then give yourself a ton of spin. Rim delay the disc so the nose is up into the wind. With your other hand put three fingers together so the finger in the center is slightly lower than the other two. Now place your nails against the outer rim. The disc should ride in the grove created by your fingers. Try to balance it there and chase after it if it begins to fall. Note that your nails will be between 6 and 7 for clock or 6 and 5 for counter.

Once you feel comfortable with this, try landing the outer rim delay from an airbrush or off of an skid or other restricted angled set. If you can pull that off you will be one of maybe five people in the world who can, and that deserves a 10 on anyones judging sheet.

By the way, does anyone know if this move has a more official name?

Matt Teaches the Rim Delay

In this video, Matt Gauthier teaches how to do a rim delay.

A rim delay is a form of nail delay, or spinning the frisbee on your finger. When most people think of the delay, they think of the frisbee balanced in the center on their finger nail. A rim delay is different. Instead, the inside rim of the frisbee is balanced against the nail. Though a rim delay does take practice to master, it can be faster to learn that the center nail delay. Yet when it is mastered, it provides an enormous depth of tricks and control over the flight of the frisbee. It is truly one of the fundamental skills of freestyle frisbee beyond throw and catch. Check the video for an indepth tutorial on mastering this skill.

The Under the Leg Pull Set

Ryan Young demonstrates the Under the Leg nail delay pull directly into a set. With clock spin, start with a center delay. Set it up flat a few inches. Then reach your right hand under the inside of your right leg. Aim for about 9 o’clock on the rim. As the disc lands on your nail, pull it under your leg using the rim. This will cause the disc to pivot on a rim delay for a fraction of a second. Rim swoop the disc to your right side and set it back into the air. Timing here is key. The longer and / or faster the swoop, the steeper the set will be. So, you can set it perfectly flat, or you can set it on a steep angle. This set is very useful for going into other restricted delay pulls, spins, chest rolls, or catches as Ryan demonstrates.

Inverted Nail delay

Here I describe how to do an inverted nail delay. The inverted hand position is where you twist your wrist so that your palm and elbow are facing up. This arm position is considered a restriction in freestyle frisbee because it reduces the movement of you elbow.

So, to get center delay control when in this position, you must move your whole body to follow the disc while keeping your arm and hand locked in place.

With clock spin, the natural rotation of the disc will cause it to turn into your wrist so you must be quick to move and keep it in the center.

On your right hand, with clock spin the disc will fall and rotate under your arm pit. It’s easy to allow this to turn into a with-the-spin crank. Don’t let it. Force the disc back to the center by rotating your body.

Once you’ve mastered this delay position, try setting it or taking it under your leg while in this position. It’s a double restriction!